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Why should anyone considering a consumer proposal hire CDPC?

It is not a trustee’s responsibility to obtain the optimal result for an individual in a consumer proposal. In fact, a trustee’s financial self-interest is diametrically opposed to that of a consumer. The more money that a consumer repays to his creditors under a consumer proposal the greater the fees earned by the trustee. Check […]

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Who is CDPC’s typical client?

CDPC’s clients live across Canada. According to Roy Toker, the Executive Vice-President of CDPC, “The typical CDPC client has between $20K and $40K in unsecured debt. Furthermore, the average client has less than $3K in net monthly household income.” Check out the video below. Today most of the Canadians hiring CDPC are not in default […]

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When should an Ontario Resident hire CDPC to negotiate an Informal Settlement?

CDPC offers two different services to Ontario residents who seek to eliminate their debt for less than 100 percent of the current outstanding balance. Check out the video below. Consumer Proposal Representation: A consumer proposal is an arrangement, subject to the federal Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA), under which a consumer makes a proposal to […]

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CDPC to represent consumers with as little debt as $6,000

Consumer Debtor Protection of Canada Ltd. (CDPC) is pleased to announce that, effective immediately, it will be representing Canadians struggling with debt who have as little as $6,000 in debt.  Prior to November 1, 2016 CDPC would not represent a Canadian doing a consumer proposal unless the consumer’s debts totaled a minimum of $10,000. Few, […]

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Bare trust: Big savings for eligible CDPCL clients

When a consumer meets with a licensed insolvency trustee (LIT), formerly known as bankruptcy trustees, to make a consumer proposal, the LIT has a number of legal obligations under federal law. These include legal duties owed to a consumer’s creditors and the Superintendent of Bankruptcy. It is not the trustee’s role to assist the consumer […]

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Why a person making a consumer proposal should hire a representative

Over the past decade consumer proposals have become an increasingly popular debt elimination strategy for Canadians.  In 2015 about 58,000 Canadians chose to deal with their debt situation by making a consumer proposal. Under a consumer proposal an individual will repay anywhere between 20 and 40 percent of his unsecured debt by making instalment payments […]

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Eliminating debt for less: Income reported under a consumer proposal

Licensed insolvency trustees (LITs), formerly known as bankruptcy trustees, are the only persons entitled to file consumer proposals on behalf of consumers. LITs, however, do not–and legally cannot–act as a consumer’s advocate or legal representative. In fact, a consumer’s best interests are often diametrically opposed to that of the LIT filing a consumer proposal on […]

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Helping clients eliminate debt for less: Lower liquidation values

When a Canadian makes a consumer proposal under federal insolvency law the consumer will only repay a percentage of their unsecured debt to the bankruptcy trustee (now known as a licensed insolvency trustee).  Creditors can vote to reject a consumer proposal if they are not satisfied with the amount of money a consumer will repay […]

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A consumer proposal is three times less expensive than credit counseling

Canadians love to share with friends, family, and co-workers the great deal they got on the purchase of clothing, an automobile, or a vacation. In the age of the internet we are very price conscious on most consumer purchases. That savviness regarding price, however, is nowhere to be found when Canadians are deciding what to […]

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